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Mayfields of South Carolina

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Union County, South Carolina

Union County was formed two years after the close of the Revolutionary War, in 1785.  The county was formed out of part of the old Ninety-Six District.  This county lay in an area that, during the Revolution, had held the highest concentration of Loyalists in all of South Carolina.

Union County Chronology

The following chronology summarizes the major milestones of Union County history:

12 March 1785:  Union County created from part of Ninety-Six District.

19 February 1791:  Union becomes part of the newly created Pickney District.

01 January 1800:  Union District created from Pickney District, with same boundaries as Union County.

16 April 1868:  Union District eliminated by SC State Constitution; Union County continued.

25 February 1897:  That part of Union north of the Pacolet River ceded to Cherokee County.

Link to Boundary Map of Union County SC

Mayfields in the Union County, South Carolina Court and Land Records (1785-1820)

01 March 1785:  William Mayfield "heir at Law to John Mayfield" of the State of South Carolina and Union County conveys a 300-acre tract of land, for 50 pounds, to Colonel Thomas Brandon of Union County.  The land is stated to be situated " ... on the main fork of Brown's Creek below the Creek Shoals ... ."  This land is the same tract that had been granted to Jacob Brown in 1754 and conveyed to John Mayfield on 02 August 1770.

14 July 1787:  "Thomas Brandon Esquire of the State of South Carolina and County of Union" conveys a 185-acre tract of land, for 32 pounds, situated on the waters of Brown's Creek, to "Mary Mayfield widow of the State and County aforesaid"  The 185-acre tract was part of a 800-acre tract of land that Brandon had patented in 1786.  No witnesses to the deed are noted. The deed was recorded in Union County on 24 September 1788.  [See Union County Deed Book A, pages 486-488]  Thomas Brandon, a wealthy Union County planter, had commanded a Whig Regiment during the Revolution and served as a Justice of the Peace for Union after the War.

06 July 1797:  John Mayfield and Unity Mayfield, his wife, make a bond with William Mayfield in the amount of 100 pounds; John and Unity secure the bond with a 50-acre tract of land "the said parcel or tract of land being willed to Unity Bailey by her mother Susana Bailey it being half of a tract of Land containing one hundred acres  ... lying on Pacolet [River]."  John and Unity sign by making their marks.  Witnesses to the bond are John Crittenden, Elizabeth Crittenden and Becky Crittenden.   Subsequently, William Mayfield assigned the bond to a certain Uriah Mullen on 3 August 1797.  The bond and the assignment were recorded in Union County, upon the oaths of John and Elizabeth Crittenden, on 03 October 1801. [See Union County Deed Book G, page 207]

24 August 1799:  Mary Mayfield of Union County, for $214, conveys a 135-acre tract of land "lying on the waters of Brown's Creek" to Joel Bentley.  This land is part of the 185-acre tract which Mary had purchased from Thomas Brandon in 1787.  Mary Mayfield signs the deed by making her mark - a distinctive capital "M" similar to the mark made by the Mary Mayfield, who signed the Appraisal and Inventory of John Mayfield, deceased in 1783.   (I consider this to be strong evidence that these two Mary Mayfields are one and the same person.) The indenture was witnessed by Bennet Jankesly and Christopher Brandon and was recorded, upon the oath of Christopher Brandon, on 22 September 1801.  [See Union County Deed Book G, pages 183-184]

24 October 1799:  Mary Mayfield of Union County, for $100, conveys a 50-acre tract of land "lying on the waters of Brown's Creek" to Randol Vaughn.  This land is part of the 185-acre tract which Mary had purchased from Thomas Brandon in 1787.  Mary Mayfield signs the deed by making her mark - a distinctive capital "M" similar to the mark made by the Mary Mayfield, who signed the Appraisal and Inventory of John Mayfield, deceased in 1783.   (I consider this to be additional strong evidence that these two Mary Mayfields are one and the same person.) The indenture was witnessed by Christopher Brandon, Robert Bevill and James Brandon.  It was recorded, upon the oath of Christopher Brandon, on 22 September 1801.  [See Union County Deed Book G, pages 185-186]

21 January 1794:  William Mayfield of Union County executes a mortgage document with John Crittenden of Union in the amount of 10 pounds and five shillings.  As security for the mortgage, William obligates his personal property consisting of " ... two feather beds, and furniture, six pewter plates and one pewter dish ... ."  William signs by making his mark.   Witnesses to the document are Absolam Bailey, Charles Crittenden and Elizabeth Crittenden.  The mortgage was recorded in Union County Court upon the oaths of Absolam Bailey and Elizabeth Crittenden on 02 April 1794. [See Union County Deed Book C, pages 349-350]

06 October 1800:  William Mayfield " ... of Union County & State of South Carolina Batchelor ... " conveys to Archibald Fore, for 25 pounds, a 100-acre tract of land " ... lying on the Southwest Side of Broad River in Union County & State of So. Carolina bounded on the East by Broad River on all other sides by vacant land ... ."  This land is stated to be the one hundred acres that " ... was granted by his Majesty George the Third as appears by the Patent dated October the third 1767 to John Mayfield Father to said William Mayfield he being his lawful heir ... ."  William Mayfield signs the above cited indenture by making his mark.  Witnesses to the above indenture are Jesse Stribling and John Mayfield (signs by mark).  The indenture is recorded on 03 November 1808 upon the oath of Jesse Stribley.  [See Union County Deed Book K, pages 92-93]

20 November 1805:   William and Sally Porter convey a 142-acre tract of land situated on the north side of Brown's Creek, to Robert Whitlock and Battle Mayfield, for $200.  Witnesses to this indenture are Robert Bevill and William Brandon.  The deed was recorded in the Union County upon the oath of Robert Beville on 18 July 1808.   [See Union County Deed Book I, pages 470-471]

02 January 1808:   Battle Mayfield and Robert Whitlock of Union District, for $290, convey to Charles Adams and Zidack Adams, the same 142-acre tract of land they had purchased from William Porter in 1805 for only $200 - a $90 profit over three years.  Witnesses to the indenture are James Brandon and Christopher Brandon.  The deed was recorded in Union County upon the oath of Christopher Brandon on 18 July 1808.  [See Union County Deed Book I, page 471]

02 December 1809:  Archibald Fore conveys the 100-acre tract of land he acquired from William Mayfield in 1800, to William Sims of Union District for $150.  Witnesses to the transaction are Charles Sims and Siles Gates.  This indenture was recorded in Union County upon the oath of Charles Sims on 22 January 1810.  [See Union County Deed Book K, pages 93-94]  The description of the location of the land is the same as that given in the original Mayfield survey and patent.  In an attempt to find out the exact location of this land, I searched the Union County records to ascertain who next purchased this 100-acre tract.  Unfortunately, I was unable to find any record of William Sims selling the land.  William may have retained ownership until his death in 1853.

William Sims (1768-1853) was a wealthy Union County planter and son of Whig Captain Charles Sims.  On 20 March 1848, William was interviewed by Lyman Draper concerning his recollections of events during the American Revolution. [See the Draper Manuscripts, Sumter Papers, 23VV261] 

In 1780, William Sims was about 12 years old and lived in that area of South Carolina which became part of Union County in 1785. In the interview, Sims mentions Thomas Fletchall, the Mayfields, Samuel McJunkin and "Bloody Bill" Cunningham as follows:

" ... I never knew Col. Fletcher [Fletchall], but I have heard much said of him. He was a peaceable and good citizen, but a Tory all the time. He left the Country with the British.

"The Mayfields were quiet & orderly men, so far as I know, but all Tories.

"I knew the McJunkin family, a very clever set of people & great Whigs. The old man, Samuel, was very angry with David for marrying into a Tory family (Chesney).

" ... I saw Bloody Bill Cunningham when he ordered my mother to leave the Country. His face was long and bony. ... "

25 February 1810:  The following record is recorded in Union County Deed Book P, page 506:  "In consideration of four dollars in hand paid to me by Christopher de Graffenreid I do assign to Christopher de Graffenreid & his heirs & assigns the within bond & the within mentioned land.  Witnesseth my hand this 25th day of February 1810."  /S/ Martha Steen (her mark), witnessed by Patsey Steen (her mark).  [See Union County Deed Book P, page 505] 

The bond so mentioned is the one executed by John Mayfield on 9 August 1770 (see above).  Martha Steen was the widow of John Steen.  Of course the 100-acre tract given as security for the bond had been sold by John Mayfield's eldest son (heir-at-law), William Mayfield, ten years previously in 1800!  Christopher De Graffenreid (1767-1831) was a wealthy planter who lived in the Neal Shoals area of Broad River in Union County.

15 March 1819:  A certain William Mayfield is selected to serve on a Grand Jury.  [See Minutes of the Court of General Sessions, Union District (1819-1832), page 2]

October Term 1819:  "Whereas Reuben Mayfield is confined in the Jail of this District on a Charge of Horse stealing and whereas [the act] for which the said Reuben Mayfield Stands Committed was perpetrated in the District of Spartanburg ... it is ordered that the Sheriff of Union District do convey the body of the said Reuben Mayfield to the Jail of the District of Spartanburg to answer to the Said Charge of Horse Stealing."  [See Minutes of the Court of General Sessions, Union District (1819-1832), page 38]

Table - Mayfields in the 1790 Census for Union

Head of Household White Males 16 and Over White Males under 16 White Females Number of Slaves
Mary Mayfield 2 2 2 0
William Mayfield 1 1 2 0

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